Skip navigation

Can we Help?

If you have any questions, just let us know. Fill in your details below and we'll get back to you.

Contact Form

Wet weather leads to more moles this summer

Summary

The wet weather has led to an explosion in the number of moles spotted in British garden spaces this summer.

Our Solution

The wet weather has led to an explosion in the number of moles spotted in British garden spaces this summer. The damp conditions have proved the perfect breeding conditions for the animals, which most gardeners consider as pests due to their excessive tunnel-building. A 'Make Your Nature Count' survey by RSPB recently found that 12 per cent of all gardens in Basingstoke, Hampshire, had signs of moles such as tunnels or hills, thisishampshire.net reports. Peter Crowden from Rutland Pest Control told telegraph.co.uk: "Normally in summer when it is hot and dry, the worms go deeper and the moles go back to their natural habitat in the woods and hedgerows." "This year, because it has been so wet, the worms have come to the surface and the moles have done the same." The conditions have meant that millions of baby moles have been born in Britain over the past few weeks. Mr Crowden said the juvenile moles are the most problematic, due to the fact that they are hard to catch and are looking for new territories. As well as moles, the RSPB has recorded a rise in the number of earthworms, slugs and snails; however it says that the bird population is suffering due to the colder weather which makes it harder for them to gather food.

Author:

Samantha Bartlett

10th September 2012