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Home workers more productive, says Microsoft

Summary

Around seven in ten employees say they are actually more productive when working from home, channelpro.co.uk reports.

Our Solution

Around seven in ten employees say they are actually more productive when working from home, channelpro.co.uk reports. When Yahoo chief Marissa Mayer banned working from home, she cited increased productivity as the reason for her decision. If the research by Microsoft is to be believed, however, the truth could be somewhat different. It found that around 70 per cent of UK workers believe their productivity increases when permitted to work from home. Much of this, it is thought, comes from workers putting added effort in to ensure they are not being perceived to be slacking. Nearly half said they send more emails whilst at home and 39 per cent said they put in longer hours, having not needed to dedicate the time to commuting. Elsewhere, thanks to super-fast domestic broadband that can be set up wirelessly from the house - to potentially reach a garden office - many workers (90 per cent) said they do not feel any less connected from their colleagues when not in the office. Despite this, 73 per cent of those questioned by Microsoft claimed that there is a general mistrust of home working by employers, which has held back wider roll-outs. Commenting on the findings, the chief envisaging officer at Microsoft, Dave Coplin, told smallbusiness.co.uk: "People don't need to be shackled to their desks to be productive or to collaborate with their colleagues. Work should be a thing you do, not a place you go. "Flexible working is more about choosing a location that best suits your requirements to get the job done. This can mean working from a variety of locations during the day, be that on the move, a shared knowledge hub, a coffee shop, a remote office or at home if need be."

Author:

David Howells

19th March 2013