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Gyllyngdune Gardens landscaping project follows Victorian philosophy

Summary

The restoration of Gyllyngdune Gardens in Falmouth has been carried out with a Victorian attitude towards gardening, according to the head gardener.

Our Solution

The restoration of Gyllyngdune Gardens in Falmouth has been carried out with a Victorian attitude towards gardening, according to the head gardener. Matt Stannard told bbc.co.uk that the £2.3 million initiative sought to keep the history of the Cornwall landmark in mind when plotting out the garden spaces, aiming to plant the sort of flowers that the Victorians would have done in their time. Gyllyngdune Gardens was originally opened to the public in 1907, with £1 million of the funding coming from the Heritage Lottery Fund, while Cornwall Council and Carrick Leisure supplied additional cash. Mr Stannard said: "It's a little hidden gem. We have exotic plants here, plants that you are not going to see in lots of other gardens as we have a special micro-climate. The Victorians were plant collectors, with strange new rare plants, and we've tried to carry that on." The project also saw the restoration of the accompanying Princess Pavilion, a quarry garden, a shell grotto and a chapel. According to falmouthpacket.co.uk, the opening of the Pavilion was marked last month with a children's event involving artists John Dyer and Joanne Short. Mr Dyer and Ms Short worked with a group of 30 youngsters to paint a picture of the gardens with the bandstand as the central focus. The occasion took place just after the Olympic flame had passed through the area.

Author:

Paul Smithson

6th June 2012