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Autumn's leaf mould could rejuvenate your garden, advises expert

Summary

As summer turns to autumn, the inevitable leaves that fall from the trees could prove to be the 'perfect pick-me-up' for soil.

Our Solution

As summer turns to autumn, the inevitable leaves that fall from the trees could prove to be the 'perfect pick-me-up' for soil. That's according to gardening expert Kate Bradbury, writing for guardian.co.uk, who believes that black, crumbly leaf mould could also be a 'boon' for veteran garden animals, such as the common blackbird. She explained how she takes to her local park armed with sacks in order to harvest the huge leaf piles that congregate in the area, as leaf mould can lace the soil with fungi to aid the absorption of nutrients. However, examiner.co.uk recommends not adding evergreen leaves to the mix, as they are generally 'too leathery' to rot down. Nonetheless, as well as leaf mould 'looking good' on the soils surface, it can also attract numerous wildlife, making the act of sitting in a garden studio watching time fly by an absolute pleasure. "In woodland, leaves fall from trees, and hedgehogs, small mammals, amphibians and countless insects shelter among them, while fungi slowly breaks the leaves down," she writes. "Blackbirds and thrushes peck through them, looking for grubs, worms and insects." In addition, if the leaves are left beyond the winter, the remains can leave nesting opportunities for hedgehogs and bumblebees, as well as 'a habitat for worms and woodlice', making the garden a perfect haven for all kinds of wildlife.

Author:

Ashley Curtis

25th September 2012